Monday, January 6, 2014

(Digital) Witness

A song for these strange times.



Annie Clark in an interview with The Quietus:
Anything that knows it is being watched changes its behaviour. We are now so accustomed to documenting ourselves and so aware that we are being watched and I think psychologically that takes a strange toll, which is going to show itself more and more as we progress. In some cases, we have this total connectivity via the internet but if we are not careful it can actually disconnect us more than we know. I’m curious as to what that is going to lead to.

4 comments:

  1. "Most recently, one of her friends from college had posted a message about having the stomach flu, and a long thread followed, with friends making suggestions about remedies, some offering sympathy, some posting photos meant to cheer her up. Mae liked two of the photos, liked three of the comments, posted her own well wishes, and sent a link to a song, “Puking Sally,” that she’d found. That prompted a new thread, 54 notices, about the song and the band that wrote it. One of the friends on the thread said he knew the bassist in the band, and then looped him into the conversation. The bassist, Damien Ghilotti, was in New Zealand, was a studio engineer now, but was happy to know that “Puking Sally” was still resonating with the flu-ridden. His post thrilled all involved, and another 129 notices appeared, everyone thrilled to hear from the actual bassist from the band, and by the end of the thread, Damien Ghilotti was invited to play a wedding, if he wanted, or visit Boulder, or Bath, or Gainesville, or St. Charles, Illinois, any time he happened to be passing through, and he would have a place to stay and a home-cooked meal. Upon the mention of St. Charles, someone asked if anyone from there had heard about Tim Jenkins, who was fighting in Afghanistan; they’d seen some mention of a kid from Illinois being shot to death by an Afghan insurgent posing as a police officer. Sixty messages later the respondents had determined that it was a different Tim Jenkins, this one from Rantoul, Illinois, not St. Charles. There was relief all around, but soon the thread had been overtaken by a multiparticipant debate about the efficacy of that war, U.S. foreign policy in general, whether or not we won in Vietnam or Grenada or even WWI, and the ability of the Afghans to self-govern, and the opium trade financing the insurgents, and the possibility of legalization of any and all illicit drugs in America and Europe. Someone mentioned the usefulness of marijuana in alleviating glaucoma, and someone else mentioned it was helpful for those with MS, too, and then there was a frenetic exchange between three family members of MS patients, and Mae, feeling some darkness opening its wings within her, signed off."
    You might enjoy The Circle, Dave Eggers. Enjoy fiind o bizarerie de cuvant in contextul asta.

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    1. Thanks so much for this excerpt.

      I doubt I'll enjoy The Circle, though. I've already made up my mind about it: I hate it. (Știi povestea cu The Boy Kings, de Kate Losse, nu?) Dar vreau să o citesc. La pachet cu The Boy Kings, bineînțeles.

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  2. Hmm, nu auzisem de cartea asta, dar tipa se pare ca il acuza pe Eggers de plagiat :))). Well, well, symptom of screen multiplicity?
    Adaugat la "to read" list!

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    1. Nu e vorba de plagiat aici. E o discuție mai lungă și mai nuanțată despre cine își permite să spună poveștile altora, despre vocea cui se aude mai puternic. White straight male authors vs. women / POC / LGBTQ; white women vs. women of color. E o temă care mă obsedează de ceva vreme, dar n-am avut timp să o explorez. Iar The Circle vs The Boy Kings ar fi un început bun. (Dacă o să citești The Boy Kings, aștept păreri.)

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